Archive for the ‘Television Writers’ Category

Happy 90th Birthday, Norman Lear!

Friday, July 27th, 2012

You may know that Norman Lear created All in the Family and The Jeffersons, but did you know that he also produced “Stand By Me” and “The Princess Bride?” Today the prolific writer/producer/director turns 90 and we take a look back at the career of the man who not only brought “Archie” and “Edith” to the small screen, but helped bring “Princess Buttercup” and “Westley” to the big screen, as well.

Born Norman Milton Lear on July 22, 1922 in New Haven, Connecticut, Lear wanted to follow in his uncle’s footsteps and become a press agent. (Lear’s uncle worked at MCA and always seemed to have a quarter to spare, even during the lean Depression years.) At the end of his senior year of high school, Lear won the American Legion Oratory Contest, earning him a scholarship to Emerson College. He left Emerson in 1942 to become a gunner in the Air Force during World War II, then fulfilled his childhood dream and worked for George and Dorothy Ross as a press agent in New York. Now married with a baby on the way, he returned to Connecticut, but soon moved to California. Leaving the life of a press agent behind, Lear performed odd jobs to make a living, including starting a business to mail celebrity addresses out by request. He and friend Ed Simmons teamed up to dabble in writing, and Lear promptly fibbed his way to the big time. He pretended to be a reporter interviewing Danny Thomas, got Thomas’ phone number, and pitched him a routine about Yiddish words that had no English counterparts. The not-Jewish Thomas wound up using the sketch at Ciro’s nightclub, giving Lear and Simmons their big break:

Agent David Susskind (who happened to be Lear’s first cousin!) then recruited the pair to write for Jack Haley’s Four Star Revue back in New York. Shortly after, in 1950, Jerry Lewis lured the duo away to write for Martin and Lewis on The Colgate Comedy Hour, where a young Bud Yorkin worked as stage manager. Martin and Lewis had recently signed movie contracts in California, so the show and its writers relocated back to the West Coast. This time Lear would stay put in sunny California.

After three years writing for Martin and Lewis, Lear and Simmons moved on to writing for The Martha Raye Show in 1954, where Lear got his first taste of directing. He split with Simmons and became a junior writer on The Tennessee Ernie Ford Show from 1957-58, where Bud Yorkin was a producer and Lear’s boss. Lear and Yorkin soon decided to form a company together, Tandem Productions. The pair complemented each other – Yorkin had more experience as a producer/director, and Lear was by then an experienced writer. They made a deal with Paramount to executive produce variety shows and specials, including The Andy Williams Show, and specials for Carol Channing, Bobby Darren, and Danny Kaye (who Lear says cooked excellent Chinese food).

Lear dabbled in films, writing the 1963 movie “Come Blow Your Horn,” and soon read an article about the British sitcom ‘Til Death Do Us Part, which featured a father-son relationship that reminded Lear of his own relationship with his father. From this premise he created All in the Family in 1968 and sold the show to ABC. He shot a pilot with Carroll O’ Connor and Jean Stapleton, but not Rob Reiner and Sally Struthers, and the show didn’t make it air. Lear then made a second pilot (also without Reiner and Struthers), which CBS picked up when Bob Wood replaced Jim Aubrey as head of the network. Just as All in the Family was starting, Lear wrote and directed the 1971 film “Cold Turkey” and was offered a three picture deal with United Artists. He turned down the deal in order to focus on All in the Family, which premiered to rather poor ratings:

CBS re-ran the series that summer and the audience grew. Then the Emmys that year did a cold open with “the four principles of All in the Family,” putting the show squarely on the map.

All in the Family showcased Lear’s talent for intertwining social consciousness with humor. In his Archive interview he explains how he can find comedy in anything:

Lear and Yorkin soon created 1972’s Sanford and Son from the British program Steptoe and Son. Redd Foxx and Demond Wilson were tapped to play the leads:

The duo produced Maude in 1972, which famously aired an episode (“Maude’s Dilemma”) in which the title character decides to have an abortion. Lear describes how the episode initially aired without significant controversy, but caused a raucous when broadcast in reruns:

Lear became master of the spin-off, creating Good Times from Maude in 1974, and The Jeffersons from All in the Family in 1975 (Maude was already an All in the Family spin-off). In 1974 he started T. A. T. Productions with Jerry Perenchio (the name comes from the Yiddish expression “Tuchus Affen Tisch,” which in Lear’s words, roughly translates to, “enough with the talk, put your ass on the table.”) Lear continued creating hit shows with 1975’s  One Day at a Time, and the critically acclaimed, but short-lived syndicated show Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman in 1976. At one point during the 1970s, Lear created/produced four of the five top shows on television. Those were the days.

He had some flops, as well. 1977’s syndicated Fernwood Tonight (aka Fernwood 2-Night) about a local talk show host, All That Glitters about male/female role reversals, and Hot L Baltimore about two prostitutes in The Hotel Baltimore, (the “E” had fallen off the sign, hence Hot L Baltimore), didn’t last beyond one season.

Lear decided to end All in the Family in 1979 (he was not involved with Archie Bunker’s Place) to dedicate more of his time to causes in which he believed – he formed the advocacy group People for the American Way in 1980. He was a member of the first group of inductees into the Television Academy Hall of Fame in 1984, along with honorees William Paley, Lucille Ball, Edward R. Murrow, David Sarnoff, and Milton Berle. Lear also became active in movie production, buying Embassy Studios (T. A. T. became Embassy Communications), and soon selling it to Coca Cola. Lear then formed (and currently serves as chairman of) Act III Communications, which produced 1986’s “Stand By Me,” 1987’s “The Princess Bride,” and 1991’s “Fried Green Tomatoes,” among others.

Lear remained active in television throughout the 1990s, producing Sunday Dinner in 1991, and 704 Hauser in 1994. More recently he’s produced several movies, including 2000’s “Way Past Cool,” and the 2011 short, “The Photographs of Your Junk (Will Be Publicized!).” We can’t wait to see what he’ll come up with next.

Happy 90th, Norman! Here’s to many, many more!

Watch Norman Lear’s full Archive interview.

- by Adrienne Faillace

Writer/Producer William Froug Turns 90!

Saturday, May 26th, 2012

Happy 90th birthday, William Froug! Froug started out as a radio writer at CBS, transitioned to television, and wound up producing some of the medium’s biggest hits. He served as a producer on The Twilight Zone, Bewitched, and Gilligan’s Island, among others. When he left production, Froug began teaching screenwriting at UCLA and authored several books on the subject, including The Screenwriter Looks at the Screenwriter and Screen-writing Tricks of the Trade.

Here are some selections from his 2011 Archive interview:

On the secret to writing for radio:

What’s the secret? I think the secret is just keep making it up as you go along. I really do. It’s one sentence at a time. I never had an outline for anything I ever did. Ever. Just start writing. If you can entertain yourself, there’s a chance you can entertain somebody else. That was my philosophy. I kept myself amused and I’m a short attention span guy. But each sentence would surprise me. I never knew what was going to happen next, and that kept me going. If I’d had an outline I would have dropped it long ago.

On working with Rod Serling as a producer on The Twilight Zone:

On why The Twilight Zone has continued to be a popular series after all these years:

I think Rod Serling. He wrote great scripts. That’s why. Stories were great. By and large they are great.

On being the Executive Producer in Charge of Drama at CBS:

It really meant I read all the scripts for dramatic series – met with the producers of dramatic series. Let them know I was going to be reading their material and make suggestions from time to time. I was greeted like cancer, you know. The blank stares “You think you’re going to tell us how to produce our series?” I’d been a line producer. I knew that wasn’t going to happen. But that was the job. So I read their scripts. Never said a word.  Never met with them. That was my job.

On why he began teaching screenwriting at UCLA:

It’s in my blood. I can’t explain that. Like what made me have to be a writer? I just knew I wanted to be a teacher. I just knew I had to do it and I love it. When I first started at CBS in radio, in the very beginning, I started a course one night a week in radio writing at CBS in one of their offices. Had about three or four people show up. But I had this urge to teach. It’s just in me. There’s no “what led me to it” anymore than what led me to be a writer.

On producing Bewitched:

I didn’t have anything to do because Bill Asher actually produced it and directed it and correctly took the credit and was married to the star. There was no role for me there, really. He just wanted somebody to be the titular producer, who he could then blame for anything that went wrong. He wasn’t interested in me as a producer. He was looking for a fall guy, basically. Because when he had battles with his wife, he didn’t have anybody to blame. Now he could blame me. That’s all right.

On his philosophy on screenwriting:

Basically, find a clear line. The key is to find a line. The storyline is king.  And Page 1, Line 1 is when the story must start. You pick up the script. Page 1, Line 1, the reader has got to know what kind of story he’s getting and what kind of genre to expect. Is it going to be a mystery? Is it going to be a comedy? What’s it going to be? I called it the opening signal: Page 1, Line 1. Then you’ve got to grab the audience within the first five pages, preferably the first two. That’s very important.

Happy 90th birthday, William! Here’s to many, many more!

Watch Froug’s two-hour Archive interview here.

Michael Patrick King Talks “Sex and the City”

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

He’s the guy responsible for bringing Carrie, Miranda, Charlotte, and Samantha into our homes every Sunday night. Michael Patrick King was executive producer of Sex and the City, HBO’s hit series about four (originally) single gals livin’ the life in New York City. Before Sex and the City, though, King wrote for Murphy Brown and Will & Grace (among other shows) and has since gone on to executive produce CBS’ 2 Broke Girls.

In his 2011 Archive Interview, King details his work on Sex and the City, and discusses (SPOILER) Carrie ending up with Big:

Speaks of his muse, Sarah Jessica Parker:

And talks about the men of Sex and the City:

For more on Sex and the City and King’s career, watch his full Archive interview.

He’s Catching Up to The 2000 Year Old Man: Carl Reiner Turns 90!

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

He’s a boy from the Bronx who’s had a hand in some of film and television’s most memorable moments. Carl Reiner turns 90 years young today, and he’s spent over 80 of those years entertaining people in one medium or another, from stage plays, to radio, to the small screen and the large.

Born Carl Reiner on March 20, 1922, Reiner caught the acting bug early in life. After performing in school plays throughout his elementary and high school years, Reiner’s older brother encouraged him to take an acting class sponsored by the Public Works Administration during the Depression years. He enjoyed honing the craft and began acting in off-Broadway plays straight out of high school; performed in summer theater in Rochester, NY; toured with a Shakespeare company; and wrote and performed plays as part of the Special Services Unit during World War II.

After his discharge from the Army in 1946, Reiner performed in the famed Borscht Belt circuit, and began his career in television in 1948 with a spot on Maggi McNellis Crystal Room, and appearances on The Fashion Story and The Fifty-fourth Street Revue. Reiner continued to do stage work, when producer Max Liebman caught one of his performances and approached Reiner about joining the cast of a new sketch variety show he was putting together with Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca, Your Show of Shows. Reiner became a cast member in the 1950-51 season, memorably starring in the recurring “Professor” sketch with Caesar, and often displaying his double talk skills, mimicking foreign languages or delivering Shakespeare-esque dialogue. In his 1998 Archive Interview, Reiner discusses working with Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca:

Reiner soon began writing for Your Show of Shows, alongside writers Neil Simon, Mel Tolkin, Lucille Kallen, and Mel Brooks, and stayed on to become a part of Sid Caesar’s next show, Caesar’s Hour, where he won his first Emmy:

Reiner and Brooks struck up an immediate friendship, which in turn led to the creation of some fantastic comedy. The pair dreamed up the now infamous “2000 Year Old Man” (which became both a record/radio and TV hit) in Max Liebman’s office in the early 1950s:

After Caesar’s Hour Reiner hosted the game show Celebrity Game, and secured dramatic parts in several Golden Age dramas including Playhouse 90, and Kraft Television Theatre. He tried his hand at writing novels and penned Enter Laughing, and even took a stab at writing a television series. He wrote what he knew, and in 1958 created thirteen episodes of Head of the Family, a show about a family man who commutes into the big city to write for a television show. Reiner starred in the pilot, which failed to get picked up, until Sheldon Leonard saw it, convinced Reiner to step out of the spotlight, re-cast Dick Van Dyke in the lead and Mary Tyler Moore as his wife, and renamed the program The Dick Van Dyke Show:

The Dick Van Dyke Show enjoyed five seasons on air (1961-66), with Reiner as creator, producer, writer, and actor on the show — on-screen he stepped out of the lead role and into that of the star’s boss, “Alan Brady”. Reiner’s movie career revved up in the 1960’s, as he starred in It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, and The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming. He soon began directing, too – he directed the film version of Enter Laughing in 1967, and wrote the pilot for and directed several episodes of 1971’s The New Dick Van Dyke Show. He directed Steve Martin in four films, including 1979’s The Jerk and 1984’s All of Me, and also directed 1987’s Summer School.

Reiner won several Emmys for The Dick Van Dyke Show, and added another to his mantle when he revisited his Dick Van Dyke Show character, “Alan Brady”, for a memorable guest appearance on a 1995 episode of Mad About You. Throughout the ’90s and 2000s Reiner continued to stay active in both film and television, with roles on the 1999 series Family Law, 2002’s Life With Bonnie, and as the voice of “Sarmoti” in 2004’s Father of the Pride. He also starred alongside George Clooney, Brad Pitt, and Matt Damon in the 2001 hit film, Ocean’s Eleven, and reprised his role of “Saul Bloom” for 2004’s Ocean’s Twelve and 2007’s Ocean’s Thirteen. He currently has recurring roles on two popular television shows: TVLand’s Hot in Cleveland and FOX’s The Cleveland Show.

A few additional Carl Reiner trivia tidbits: he has appeared on all major versions of The Tonight Show – with hosts Steve Allen, Jack Paar, Johnny Carson, Jay Leno, and even Conan O’Brien; he’s the father of another quite famous actor/writer/producer/director – Rob Reiner; and much like Carol Burnett, when he was starring on a variety show, he used a secret signal to communicate with family members. Son Rob shared what that signal was in his 2004 Archive Interview:

Happy 90th birthday, Carl! Here’s to many, many more!

Watch Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks do their “2000 Year Old Man” sketch:

Reiner was honored by the Television Academy in October of 2011, and several of his colleagues and friends were in attendance to pay tribute to the TV legend. You can watch the webcast of “An Evening Honoring Carl Reiner” here, and check out our full Archive interview with Reiner here.

- by Adrienne Faillace

Chuck Lorre: From Songwriter to Showrunner

Monday, March 5th, 2012

You probably know that Chuck Lorre is the co-creator of Two and a Half Men, Mike and Molly, and The Big Bang Theory.  You may not know that he also wrote the Debbie Harry song, “French Kissin’ in the U.S.A.” and co-wrote the theme song to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. He is a man of many talents.

Lorre got his start in television with DIC Animation and Marvel, working on shows like Heathcliff and the Catillac Cats and Muppet Babies, and soon segued into sitcoms, writing for Charles in Charge, My Two Dads and Roseanne. He also co-created Dharma & Greg and Grace Under Fire. In his 2012 Archive interview, Lorre reflects on his career and offers some advice to aspiring writers:

Lorre was inducted into the Television Hall of Fame at the March 1st ceremony at the Beverly Hills Hotel, joining performers Vivian Vance and Bill Frawley, executive Michael Eisner, executive producers Mary-Ellis Bunim and Jonathan Murray, host Mario Kreutzberger (aka Don Francisco), and lighting director Bill Klages as the newest inductees. Watch Chuck Lorre’s full three-hour Archive interview here.

2012 Television Academy Hall of Fame

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

Two and a Half Men star and Emmy winner Jon Cryer will host tonight’s 21st Annual Television Hall of Fame Gala at the Beverly Hills Hotel. Performers Vivian Vance and Bill Frawley, executive Michael Eisner, show creator-producer Chuck Lorre, executive producers Mary-Ellis Bunim and Jonathan Murray, host Mario Kreutzberger (aka Don Francisco), and lighting director Bill Klages will become the newest inductees into the Television Academy’s Hall of Fame.

Presenters at tonight’s ceremony include: Gail Berman presenting to Mary-Ellis Bunim & Jonathan Murray, Garry Marshall presenting to Michael Eisner, Sofia Vergara presenting to Mario Kreutzberger, Walter Miller presenting to Bill Klages, Peter Roth presenting to Chuck Lorre, Doris Singleton presenting to Vivian Vance, and Barry & Stan Livingston presenting to William Frawley. Mary-Ellis Bunim, Vivian Vance and William Frawley will be inducted posthumously.

The Archive of American Television has conducted interviews with several of the new honorees, and with many of their colleagues. Below enjoy selections from Archive interviews with or touting this year’s Hall of Fame inductees:

Congratulations to all of the honorees!

More from our Featured Story on the 21st Annual Hall of Fame Inductees.

Remembering Andy Rooney

Saturday, November 5th, 2011

CBS News has announced that legendary journalist Andy Rooney died today, November 5th, at the age of 92. He had recently suffered complications from a “minor surgery” done shortly after he stepped down from 60 Minutes last month.

The Archive of American Television interviewed Andy Rooney in 1999. When we asked him how he’d like to be remembered, he said: “I’d like to be remembered as a good writer, [but] I won’t be, I’ll be remembered as Andy Rooney, the guy who does those little things at the end of 60 Minutes.”

Rooney talks about 60 Minutes and the rest of his long and distinguished career, that began as a print correspondent during World War II in his four-hour Archive of American Television interview. Here are some excerpts from the interview:

On writing and producing the documentary Sinatra

On the documentary Black History: Lost Stolen or Strayed

On Mr. Rooney Goes to Washington

On his start on 60 Minutes

On his 60 Minutes essays “A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney”

On his “Essay on War”

Watch his full interview at http://emmytvlegends.org/interviews/people/andy-rooney

Full Interview description:
Andy Rooney spoke about his 50-year career as a writer and producer for television. Rooney detailed his roots as a journalist writing for The Stars and Stripes during World War II. He talked about his entrance into radio and television as a staff writer for Arthur Godfrey and later on television’s The Morning Show with Will Rogers, Jr. and The Seven Lively Arts. He described his shift to the non-fiction form working on such CBS series as The Twentieth Century and Calendar. It was on the later series that Rooney first worked with newsman Harry Reasoner. He spoke in detail about the many CBS documentary specials the two collaborated on (Rooney as writer, Reasoner as narrator) including: An Essay on Doors (1964), A Bird’s Eye View of America (1964), and The Strange Case of the English Language (1968). Rooney talked about several other documentaries in which he contributed as a producer, writer, or a combination of the two including: Sinatra (1965, re-shown on CBS in 1998) and Black History: Lost, Stolen, or Strayed (1968, Emmy winner). He talked about his long association with 60 Minutes, which began in 1968 when he wrote and appeared in (in silhouette) the recurring segment “Digressions,” a tongue-in-check 30-second “debate” on current events. He talked about his temporary break with CBS when the network refused to air an anti-Vietnam War piece An Essay on War, and the subsequent airing of it on PBS’s The Great American Dream Machine. Rooney described several documentaries he made for ABC and CBS in the 1970s including: A Small Town in Iowa, Mr. Rooney Goes to Washington, and Mr. Rooney Goes to Dinner. Rooney spoke of his work writing and appearing in “A Few Minutes With Andy Rooney,” the literate and often cantankerous essays on everyday life that appear as an end-of-the program tag to 60 Minutes, a spot he occupied since 1978. The interview was conducted by Don Carleton on June 22, 1999.

Uncovering CSI: Creator Anthony E. Zuiker’s Interview is Now Online

Tuesday, September 20th, 2011

The Archive of American Television “interrogated” CSI creator Anthony E. Zuiker in 2010. His full interview is now online.
See some video excerpts, below:

Anthony Zuiker wrote the pilot in two days

CSI was one of those scripts where I did research for three days.  I wrote the teleplay in two days.  I think I changed five words in it. And every writer who’s had some success, knows that there are those that just kind of channel down from the heavens, that  you’re just the typist. And that’s what “CSI” was. It really was the first thing I wrote, we shot every word of what I first wrote.

Screaming “I’m just the writer!” does not protect you at a crime scene

The ride-along happened before the construction of the pilot. As luck would have it– I met Daniel Holstein, who’s the real-life Gil Grissom– who’s  one of 15 people licensed in blood splatter analysis.  Keeps maggots inside of vials inside of his desk.  So I went on ride-alongs.  And on day two, there was a 19-year-old woman who lured another woman back to a motel.  And we got the call for a sexual assault. The next thing I know, we’re blowing red lights at 100 miles an hour. I was freaked out, scared to death.  We show up…The 19-year-old they couldn’t find. So the CSI, to be a big shot, said, “Hey!  Here’s some gloves and some booties and a little comb. Why don’t you go comb around the bed for biologicals.  Ha, ha, ha.”  So I had my little book and I was being a fake CSI and looking for things…  Next thing I know, the bed started moving. I lifted the bed skirt and there are two sets of eyes.  The 19-year-old girl comes out.  She scratches my face.  I jump to the ceiling.  The guy pulls out a gun and “Freeze!”  And they drag her out and handcuff her and slam her on the bed, and I’m like, “I’m just the writer, man!  I’m just the writer.” But what I’ve learned– is that law enforcement, if they don’t do their job right and clear the scene, then people will hang around or harm the CSIs trying to get the evidence to convict them.  They didn’t clear the scene properly.  That’s how come I got quasi-attacked.  But if you watch the pilot closely, you’ll see that Holly Gribbs was shot at the end of the pilot, and that’s where I got the idea.

You won’t see the CSI crime lab in real-life.

When you walk through a crime lab in Las Vegas, or even the number two lab in the country, or even in Quantico, they’re very boring, four walls, drab, don’t smell nice. Very archaic equipment. PCV pipes and tubes, drapes, machinery, unorganized.  It’s not a very pretty sight. But we are doing television, so we had to sex it up, so to speak. So we did these really state-of-the-art, cool sets with see-through windows and state-of-the-art computers and made it feel like you were in sexy Washington, in terms of the state-of-the-art buildings that you might see that might be Frank Lloyd Wright-designed. It was to give it a sense of pace and style, and that’s what we did.

On the inspiration behind “C.S.I”

On breaking TV rules

On how “C.S.I” stands out

On naming “C.S.I”

On pitching the show

Anthony Zuiker’s full  interview is now online at http://emmytvlegends.org/interviews/people/anthony-zuiker.

Exactly WHO are they talking to? Christopher Lloyd on “Modern Family” & more

Friday, September 16th, 2011

Writer/producer and 8-time Emmy winner Christopher Lloyd was interviewed by the Archive in 2010.

He discussed writing for The Golden Girls, Frasier, and in great detail about the Emmy-winning comedy series Modern Family (nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series again this year!) which Lloyd co-created with Steven Levitan. He also talked about the influence his father, comedy writer David Lloyd (The Mary Tyler Moore Show) had on him. Watch the 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards this Sunday, September 18 on FOX.

On developing Modern Family:

On Modern Family’s mockumentary style and the “stolen camera” approach:

On casting Modern Family (Ed O’Neill, Ty Burrell, Sofia Vergara, Julie Bowen, Eric Stonestreet, Jesse Tyler Ferguson):

On coming up with ideas for the show:

On the production schedule and format of the show:

On being surprised by the success of the show:

On his favorite Modern Family episodes:

On working with partner Steven Levitan:

On working with actors versus writers:

On what he strives to achieve on Modern Family:

Christopher Lloyd’s full interview can be viewed here.

Matthew Weiner on “Mad Men”

Friday, September 16th, 2011

Matthew Weiner, Nominated for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series, was interviewed for four hours about his entire career to-date by the Archive of American Television in 2010.  He discussed the creation and development of Mad Men (also nominated for Outstanding Drama Series) in great detail, including decisions about the style and costuming of the show, the direction, the editing, and casting of the main characters and storylines. See Matthew Weiner’s full interview here.

On the philosophy behind the show’s style and attention to detail:

On Mad Men’s “Don Draper”:

On how Jon Hamm almost wasn’t cast as “Don Draper” on Mad Men:

On the character “Joan Holloway” played by Christina Hendricks on Mad Men:

On the unintended sex appeal of “Joan Holloway”:

On why writing for The Sopranos helped make Mad Men possible:

On the Season 4 finale of Mad Men:

On his advice to aspiring writers:

More videos and a full list of nominees are up at emmytvlegends.org/interviews/shows/emmy-awards-the-63rd-annual-2011

The 2011 Emmy Awards will be held this Saturday, September 18 and telecast on FOX. Other nominees interviewed by the Archive of American Television are:

David Crane, Nominated for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series (Episodes) on his advice to aspiring writers:

Michael J. Fox for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series (“Louis Cannin” on The Good Wife)

Christopher Lloyd, Nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series (co-creator of Modern Family), on what Modern Family is about:

Tim Van Patten , Nominated for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series (Game of Thrones) on working with Boardwalk Empire‘ (also nominated)s executive director Martin Scorcese