Archive for the ‘"Seinfeld"’ Category

20 Years Later – Is Seinfeld Still Stuck in that Parking Garage?

Sunday, October 30th, 2011

“The problem with the mall garage is that everything looks the same. They try to differentiate between levels. They put up different colors, different numbers, different letters. What they need to do is name the levels, like, ‘Your mother’s a whore.’ You would remember that.”

So proclaimed Jerry Seinfeld in the “Parking Garage” episode of Seinfeld, which first aired on NBC twenty years ago today, on October 30, 1991. This 23rd episode of the series where Jerry, Kramer, George and Elaine wander aimlessly in a parking garage, placed 33rd on TV Guide’s list of the 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time. A dying goldfish, a frightening condition called uromisitisis poisoning (which apparently does not justify public urination), and a sensitive Christian Scientist all make it into the plot of one of the series’ most beloved episodes. And here’s a fun fact: according to editor Janet Ashikaga, the episode is based on the parking garage at L.A.’s Century City Mall.

Ashikaga, director Tom Cherones, and production designer Tom Azzari share their memories of one of the series’ most difficult episodes to shoot:

Editor Janet Ashikaga on Tom Cherones’ innovative ideas on “The Parking Garage”:

Director Tom Cherones on deciding where and how to shoot the episode:

Production Designer Tom Azzari on crafting “The Parking Garage” set:

Learn more about Seinfeld’s “Parking Garage” episode: http://www.emmytvlegends.org/interviews/shows/seinfeld-the-parking-garage

George Shapiro on Andy Kaufman, Jerry Seinfeld, and more!

Tuesday, June 28th, 2011


George Shapiro has had the pleasure, although some might call it the challenge, of managing the seemingly unmanageable Andy Kaufman. In his Archive interview, manager George Shapiro describes his work with comedians Andy Kaufman and Jerry Seinfeld, among others, and discusses the intricacies of negotiating television appearances and series for clients. In the following excerpt Shapiro details the unbelievable story of how Andy Kaufman secured the role of “Latka” on Taxi:

You can view George Shapiro’s full interview here.

More about this interview:
George Shapiro was interviewed for approximately two hours in Los Angeles, CA. Shapiro discusses his early years growing up in the Bronx, where he met his longtime business partner, Howard West, and describes working his way up from mailroom attendant to packaging executive at the William Morris Agency. He talks about his work with The Steve Allen Show and That Girl, and details his decision to leave William Morris to form his own management company, Shapiro/West. He speaks at length on working with client Andy Kaufman, on negotiating Kaufman’s intricate deal with Taxi, and on Kaufman’s premature death. Shapiro also comments on client Jerry Seinfeld, explains how Seinfeld got on the air, and concludes with thoughts on the art of management and his philosophy on comedy. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview in a joint venture with The American Comedy Archives (at Emerson College) on February 12, 2007.

Celebrate Father’s Day with Rob Petrie, Frank Costanza, Homer Simpson, and Mr. C.

Sunday, June 19th, 2011

Happy Father’s Day! To celebrate we’ve highlighted interview clips from some of our favorite TV Dads:

Tom Bosley on playing Howard “Mr. C.” Cunningham on Happy Days

Jerry Stiller on playing Seinfeld’s “Frank Costanza”

Dan Castellaneta on the origin of Homer Simpson’s “d’oh”

Dick Van Dyke on The Dick Van Dyke Show’s Rob Petrie

Happy Birthday to Jerry Stiller!

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

Archive Interviewee Jerry Stiller celebrates his 84th birthday today. We interviewed Jerry back in 2005 along with his wife, Anne Meara. The full interview with Jerry and Anne can be viewed online.

In this clip, Jerry discusses how he came to be cast as “Frank Costanza” on Seinfeld. He talks about how initially, Frank’s character was to be a meek man in a bald cap, subservient to Estelle Harris’s “Estelle Costanza”; but Jerry’s “Frank” wound up shouting back at her, just as loudly. And we thank him for it!

About this Interview:
Jerry Stiller was interviewed for three-and-a-half hours in Los Angeles, CA, consisting of two parts: over one hour with wife and comedy partner Anne Meara, and over two hours alone. Stiller and Meara described how they met as working actors in New York City. They talked about getting together as an act and their many appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show. They described their comedy routines and the interaction that they had with Ed Sullivan himself. Stiller talked about his notable work in such long form productions as Seize the Day. He then spoke in detail about the role for which he is most associated, “Frank Costanza” on Seinfeld,as well as his regular appearance as “Arthur Spooner” on The King of Queens. For these series he gave his impressions of working with the regular cast members and for Seinfeld he talked about such notable epsiodes as “The Doorman,” “The Fusilli Jerry,” and “The Strike.” The interview was conducted by Gary Rutkowski on December 12, 2005. Scroll upScroll down

James Hong Interview Now Online

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

Interview Description:

In his Archive interview, James Hong talks about his career as one of the most recognizable Asian-American character actors, discussing his experiences appearing in such TV series as: The New Adventures of Charlie Chan, Kung Fu, Hawaii Five-O, Seinfeld, and The Big Bang Theory. Additionally, he speaks about his featured role in the film Blade Runner (“I just do eyes”), how he came to write the story for an episode of Bachelor Father, and how his casting on the telefilm Pueblo was a career highpoint (having initially lost the role).  Hong describes how little has changed for Asian-American actors in terms of the kinds of roles offered.  He notes portrayals, however, in which he either played the role in a non-cliche way (such as a guest role on Dragnet) or worked within the role to create a full-bodied character (such as in the feature film Black Widow). Hong also talks about his agent Bessie Loo, who was Hollywood’s main agent for Asian-American actors.  James Hong was interviewed in North Hollywood, CA on April 27, 2010; Stephen Bowie conducted the two-and-a-half-hour interview.

"The Ed Sullivan Show" Celebrates Its 60th Anniversary– Stiller & Meara Interview Now Online

Friday, June 27th, 2008

The Ed Sullivan Show was a Sunday night fixture from the moment most Americans bought their first television sets through 1971, when, after 1,087 shows over 23 years, it went off the air on May 30th.

Ed Sullivan was a columnist for the New York Daily News, and despite what many considered an awkward stage presence, he became a television star, memorable for the immortal line, “we’ve got a really big shew.” Sullivan was voted one of the 50 Greatest TV Stars of All-Time by TV Guide in 1996. They described him thusly: “Sullivan’s puckered syntax was an impressionist’s delight, and his body language was so tense and herky-jerky he made Richard Nixon seem like Nureyev…. [but he] was, for all intents and purposes, nothing less than America’s minister of culture.”

The Ed Sullivan Show indeed saw a myriad of the top talent of the day appear on its stage. For every novelty act there was the greatest classical, comedy, stage, or musical performer. Possibly the most famous appearance in the show’s history occurred on February 9, 1964— when the Beatles made their American television debut.

The Ed Sullivan Show was initially called The Toast of the Town (its name through 1955) when it debuted on June 20, 1948. Among the guests were Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, and Variety noted “CBS was guilty again, however, of permitting them to give out with some blue material, okay for their nitery work but certainly not for the tele.”

A fixture of the show in its earliest broadcasts were the June Taylor Dancers. So famed did the June Taylor Dancers become, that when the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences first bestowed an Emmy Award for Best Choreography, in 1953, it was June Taylor who won (for The Jackie Gleason Show).

The Archive of American Television has interviewed many individuals who worked in front of and behind-the-scenes on The Ed Sullivan Show. Among those interviewees are: choreographer June Taylor, talent booker Vince Calandra, and director John Moffitt; among the performers: Marge Champion, Mike Douglas, Jerry Stiller & Anne Meara, and Andy Williams.

Jerry Stiller & Anne Meara were interviewed separately about their extensive television careers and together to discuss their collaborative work— notably as guests 36 times on The Ed Sullivan Show.

Interview Description for Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara:

Stiller and Meara described how they met as working actors in New York City. They talked about getting together as an act and their many appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show. They described their comedy routines and the interaction they had with Ed Sullivan himself. Stiller talked about his notable work in such long form productions as Seize the Day. He then spoke in detail about the role for which he is most associated, “Frank Costanza” on Seinfeld, as well as his regular appearance as “Arthur Spooner” on The King of Queens. For these series he gave his impressions of working with the regular cast members and for Seinfeld he talked about such notable epsiodes as “The Doorman,” “The Fusilli Jerry,” and “The Strike.” Meara talked about her later work that included the regular role of “Veronica Rooney” on Archie Bunker’s Place and a recurring role on HBO’s Sex and the City.