Archive for the ‘Archive Top Picks’ Category

Chicago’s Museum of Broadcast Communications Reopens!

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

After 6 years in the making, the Museum of Broadcast Communications (MBC) in Chicago will have its Grand Opening and Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony tomorrow, Wednesday, June 13th at 10am! Tonight, Chicagoans Betty White, Hugh Downs, and John Mahoney will be in the Windy City to celebrate at a gala for the museum’s new home, which is located at 360 N. State St.

The MBC exhibits “historic and contemporary radio and television content,” including TV and radio programs, memorabilia, and interactive displays. Within the impressive collection is the RCA TK-2 camera that was used as then-Senator Kennedy’s close-up camera in the first Kennedy-Nixon debate, which took place in Chicago.

Since 2009, the Archive has integrated the text of the definitive Encyclopedia of Television, authored by The Museum of Broadcasting Communications, into our website. The Encyclopedia brings extensive additional information about the Archive’s interview subjects to the portal, including the history of popular series, key dates, and background on performers, crew and controversies, all catalogued within the vast library of EmmyTVLegends.org.

Congrats to our friends at the MBC! We can’t wait to see the new museum!

For more on our collaboration with the MBC, click here. To watch a video segment on the new museum, click here.

7 pieces of comic wisdom from Phyllis Diller

Friday, March 11th, 2011

Phyllis Diller was interviewed for the Archive of American Television in 2000 about her long career in comedy, both on TV and the stage. Her trademark cigarette, fright wig, and of course, that iconic laugh were all discussed during her three-hour interview by Fred Wostbrock. We’ve selected some short clips from Phyllis about her tricks of the trade, and advice to young comics (not “comediennes”, she prefers “comic”!) and just how the heck to be funny after all these years.

Phyllis Diller’s advice to aspiring comics:

On her iconic laugh:

On the difference between being a comedic actress and a “COMIC”:

On why she always held a prop cigarette:

On why she picked on “Fang” and how he became a standard bit in her act:

On her iconic “look”- the wig, the theatrics:

On the importance of TV to a comic’s career:

10 things you may not know about “Star Trek”

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

The Archive of American Television has interviewed many actors, visual effects artists, directors, stuntmen, writers, and others involved in the production of NBC’s Star Trek (1966-1969) as well as its spin-offs. Below are a few gems from the archive’s collection featuring stories you may not have heard before about the series and its cast. From Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy) to Lt. La Forge (LeVar Burton), check out the full interviews with each of these TV legends in the videos and links below.

For Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry, the characters were all metaphors for a larger vision

George Takei explains how “Sulu” got his name.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. convinced “Uhura” to stay on Star Trek!

Nichelle Nichols (“Uhura”) was about to quit the series, when a chance encounter with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. opened her eyes to the important role that she had in representing African-Americans on television.

Leonard Nimoy created Mr. Spock’s “Vulcan salute”

Leonard Nimoy (“Mr. Spock”) explains where the famed “Vulcan salute” came from.

William Shatner almost missed out on being “Captain Kirk”

William Shatner was cast as “Alexander the Great” but thankfully, the project failed and he took the role of “Captain Kirk” by default.

Joan Collins’ daughter convinced her to appear on Star Trek

Actress Joan Collins appeared on one of Star Trek’s most beloved episodes and even attended a convention!

The Enterprise’s “whoosh” in Star Trek’s opening was voiced by the theme’s composer

Composer  Alexander Courage describes how he came up with the theme song for Star Trek.

A wig saved Next Generation’s Captain Picard!

Star Trek: Next Generation producer Rick Berman explains how Patrick Stewart almost wasn’t cast as “Captain Picard.”

“Khan” left Mr. Roarke in the dust

Ricardo Montalban was worried audiences would identify him with Fantasy Island’s “Mr. Roarke” when he reprised the role of “Khan” on Star Trek, but he was able to find the character’s true voice by watching the original 1967 episode “Space Seed” where he first played “Khan.

Star Trek: The Next Generation’s Geordi could see all, but the actor playing him saw almost nothing!

LeVar Burton “Geordi La Forge” actually could not see behind his character’s visor.

The secret to the transporter effect was fireworks

Director Joseph Wilcots reveals how the shimmery effect was created.

For more about Star Trek, visit the Archive’s curated show page.