Posts Tagged ‘“Everybody Loves Raymond”’

Love Is On the Air

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

(Reposted from 2/13/13 MediaPost article by Karen Herman with permission)

In time for Valentine’s Day, the Archive of American Television opens its vault to find out what our interviewees had to say about some of TV’s classic relationships:

Writer Sam Denoff on “That Girl” Here were these two people who were in love, which made the show work. People remember more about Donald and Ann Marie than all the things that she got into, which is the secret of all the great shows. “All in the Family,” “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” “The Honeymooners,” “I Love Lucy” were all love stories….

I don’t think any episode mentioned, “Shall we do it?” It wasn’t if they did or didn’t — it wasn’t important.

There was a responsibility to each other that made for the comedy. “I want to do something, but will he or she be mad?” That’s why marriage works, because it’s a comedy.

Actress Jean Stapleton on “All in the Family”On the surface, Archie was that incredible, ignorant bigot — but Edith saw more than that.  Edith was in love with this man. We had some tender moments that were dramatized, perhaps more off-camera…The whole substance of their marriage is something that was probably very sweet.

Actress Tyne Daly on keeping it real with Mary Beth Lacey’s husband on “Cagney & Lacey”We weren’t beautiful, and we weren’t invested in being beautiful…. It was an idealized marriage, but it was a blue-collar marriage. They weren’t the folks on The Hill, they were the folks on the couch. And they conflicted nicely. They fought fair.

Producer Aaron Spelling on “Starsky and Hutch”We said many times, it was the first heterosexual [all-male] love affair on television. Paul Michael Glaser’s character loved hamburgers, all that jazz, and David Soul liked French food.  They disagreed about everything, but they were really terrific together. It was their relationship more than the cases.  It had lots of humor in it. It wasn’t just car chases.

Actress Isabel Sanford on the love between “The Jeffersons”Louise kept George in tow. That’s how it lasted that long. George really loved Louise. He was hotheaded, but he listened to her. Whether he thought he had the last word or not, she had the last word. That’s how that marriage lasted as long as it did.  Nobody would put up with George like Louise!

Actress Suzanne Pleshette on the mature love of “The Bob Newhart Show”– Bob and Emily Hartley were a unique couple, something that had never been on television. First, we were a married couple who loved each other. We did not denigrate each other. We were partners; we were equals. We were smart and both working.  There were no children to teach us lessons. Howard, our next-door neighbor, was our child, in effect.

We were obviously sexual. I’m very demonstrative, [and] Bob hates that [but] he was obliged to endure it, and that became something wonderful about our relationship.

Creator Phil Rosenthal on why “Everybody Loves Raymond,” including Debra — People say Debra’s so mean to him. But we always felt [that] she’s justified, she has every right to yell at him. She’s doing it all, and she doesn’t get a break.

When we analyze it, what does keep a couple together? I think what… keeps us with that other person more than anything, is not the physical; it’s the common sense of humor.  It’s that you laugh at what I say and I laugh at what you do and we both find the same things funny….

I feel like it’s never really mentioned, but Debra loves Ray because he’s fun…. Comedy’s conflict — but every once in a while, he makes her laugh. And you get it.

Comedian Brad Garrett on “Raymond,” “Ratatouille,” and Robert Barone

Saturday, April 14th, 2012

He’s best known for playing “Robert Barone” on CBS’ Everybody Loves Raymond, but he’s also a prolific voiceover artist (he’s “Gusteau” in Ratatouille!), and co-star of another successful sitcom, ‘Til Death, with Joely Fisher. Brad Garrett sat down with us in 2007 for quite an entertaining interview. (Be prepared for lots of jokes and silly side conversations with those off-camera!)

Garrett on winning the role of “Robert Barone:”

Watch Brad Garrett’s full Archive interview.

About this interview:

In his two-hour Archive interview, Brad Garrett discusses his early comedy influences and breaking into stand-up comedy as a teenager. He talks about his first appearance on television on Norm Crosby’s Comedy Shop and his contest-winning turn on Star Search. He describes two short-lived sitcoms on which he appeared before landing the role for which he is most known, that of “Robert Barone” on Everybody Loves Raymond. He speaks in detail about the show’s nine season run — describing his character, commenting on the ensemble cast and series creator Phil Rosenthal, and recalling favorite episodes. Garrett also discusses his next sitcom success, playing twenty-years-married “Eddie Stark” on ‘ Til Death — a series on which he was also a producer. He speaks of playing comic icon Jackie Gleason in the 2002 made-for-television movie Gleason, and touches on then-current projects including voicing “Gusteau” in Pixar’s Ratatouille. Gary Rutkowski conducted the interview in Malibu, CA on April 26, 2007.

Phil Rosenthal Talks “Everybody Loves Raymond” and the Craft of Writing

Friday, January 27th, 2012

Phil Rosenthal wanted to be an actor.  He and several friends in New York wrote a show called “Tony and Tina’s Wedding”, in which he acted, and an agent saw his work and told him to come to LA to pursue acting. Rosenthal did, and instead wound up meeting up with high school friend Alan Kirschenbaum, writing a screenplay, and falling in love with writing.

A self-described TV addict, Rosenthal grew up watching The Honeymooners, Your Show of Shows, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, and All in the Family. He discusses how the TV shows he liked as a kid shaped his sensibilities as a writer and helped to teach him structure:

After several years as a staff writer with writing partner Oliver Goldstick on A Family for Joe, Baby Talk, Down the Shore, and Coach, Rosenthal branched out on his own and created the popular sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond. In the following clip, he shares how he came up with the show’s title:

Everybody Loves Raymond ran for nine years on CBS, and lives on in syndication. Below Rosenthal describes his vision for what the series finale would be:

To learn more about Phil Rosenthal, and to see his tips for sitcom writing, watch his full interview here.

Everybody Loves Patricia Heaton

Monday, January 9th, 2012

With her success on Everybody Loves Raymond and now The Middle, Patricia Heaton is a household name. But that wasn’t always so. Heaton spent years as a struggling actress in New York and Los Angeles, doing bit parts and odd jobs to make a living. Her first appearance on a television show was on 1989’s Alien Nation; her first recurring role was on the critically acclaimed dramedy, thirtysomething, and her first starring role was on the short-lived 1992-3 series, Room For Two, opposite Linda Lavin. Several more years passed before she won the role of “Debra Barone” on Everybody Loves Raymond.

In her Archive Interview, Heaton describes her audition for Everybody Loves Raymond:

She speaks of her Everybody Loves Raymond family:

And discusses the show’s finale:

Watch Patricia Heaton’s interview here.

About this interview:

Patricia Heaton was interviewed for nearly two hours in Burbank, CA. Heaton talks of growing up a “daydreamer” in Cleveland and enjoying the attention she got as the daughter of Chuck Heaton, a well-known local sportswriter.  She describes her early years as a struggling actress in New York City and Los Angeles, picking up small roles in commercials and television series.  She discusses her recurring role in the hit dramedy series thirtysomething and her co-starring roles in the short-lived series Room for Two (opposite Linda Lavin, who mentored her) and Women of the House. Heaton then details the role and series for which she is best known, “Debra Barone” on Everybody Loves Raymond. She chronicles her work on the series from her audition, to shooting the series finale (which was delayed when she contracted laryngitis).  She describes the series’ shooting schedule, working with series’ directors Gary Halvorson and Will MacKenzie, and how her real-life pregnancies were covered up on the show. She also notes some of the moments of the show that garnered the biggest laughs, including: Debra’s desperate attempts to get a turkey in the oven, Raymond trying lift Debra onto the refrigerator in a moment of glee and slamming her into it, and Debra dropping ice cream on Raymond’s lap (eliciting a “minute and a half laugh”).  Lastly, she touches on her appearances as spokesperson for Albertsons grocery stores and on some of her post-Raymond television movies. Karen Herman conducted the interview on October 23, 2006.